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Newer doesn’t always mean better…

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RISE
 RISE
(@rise)
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I’m of this mentality. Especially in this industry, the hype train is king and marketing strategies are so strong these days that even I succumb to them. More and more people buy, based on how things are presented vs the actual quality of any given product. That quality that was so prevalent in past years seems to be fading away…often in favor of “lighter materials”, “latest and greatest” tech, etc. IMO…That old saying…“they just don’t make em like they used to” applies now, more than ever, with the exception of certain products from certain companies/manufacturers. Maximize profit, minimize overhead…the perfect biz model, right?

There’s a reason I’ve hoarded as much older tackle as possible. Tolerances may be tighter in some areas these days, reels might feel smoother/more refined, etc, but that doesn’t always translate into better quality, IMO. Hence, there’s a reason I’ve become much more selective when it comes to buying current year gear. Unfortunately, most of the newer stuff doesn’t speak to me the way the older, more eclectic, better quality built stuff does. Those “golden years” were untouchable. Everyone seemed to have a style of their own, whereas today, fishing tackle is starting to resemble the car industry…much of it is blending together. Don’t get me wrong…there are still some manufacturers out there that stand out/work hard at being original in some capacity, and I understand that it’s tough to do so, but with some effort and actual thought…we’ve seen what can be done.

 

Thoughts?


   
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Gaijin
(@gaijin)
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I agree 100%. In an industry that is passion driven we have lost the passion. It will always be about money for the suppliers but I miss the days where it was a culture that they were building and supporting vs an industry that they are commercializing on with bling that doesn’t last long. Most of my gear is older than 2015 and I’m very content with that. Because they don’t make them like they used to. 


   
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pkn8
 pkn8
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Posted by: @rise

Those “golden years” were untouchable.

I think a lot of the time we look back at the "golden years" because companies fail to improve off of those "golden years" moving forward. I feel like it usually falls into 1 of 2 categories, could be because those "golden years" were just too good/hard to replicate or the companies get lazy with all the money they get regardless of their product. Not sure how RnD works in fishing companies but that's just my thought. Perhaps Loomis was onto something when it took them years and years to "upgrade" the NRX line. lol If it ain't broke...

 

Posted by: @gaijin

I miss the days where it was a culture that they were building and supporting vs an industry that they are commercializing on with bling that doesn’t last long.

Mike Gilbert (Working Class Zero) spoke a little about this in a podcast and I think he is moving in the right direction. He spoke about how the skateboard industry is driven by the actual skateboarders (whether big name or just a local skater) and so it has stayed pretty "grass roots". I feel like the fishing industry (particularly in the US) has strayed so far away from that. I cannot remember the last lure that was truly innovative that was brought to market by a US Company. Every iCast show or BassMaster show all I ever see are rehashes of ideas that have always been on the market, just rebranded. Feels like they just wait for the next best thing rather than try and make it happen. Japan on the other hand still has small pop up companies trying to create new innovative lures. The lures are built by/for fisherman. Now I'm not saying they don't have "copycat syndrome" over there but it just seems like they have more drive to create rather than reinvent the wheel.

Always learning...


   
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Good Times
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100% to the core. What goes up, must come down.


   
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dragon1
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SCHITE...makes me feel guud that a few of my preferred Daiwa threadlines are still worm gear oscillation.  Lol.

Agreed overall.  Also the Golden age of US blank and rod makers died way back in the early 2000s, as did makes like Daiko and Evola in Japan, and even OG Classic Megabass to a certain extent.

If only I was able to hoard da guud schite to even an inkling of the level that Greg does...


   
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BlitzDR
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Part of the “problem” with improvement is defining what actual improvement is.  Is it technology?  Is it design?  Is it material?  Second point, how much is that final improvement and is it worth the cost to consumer?

A lot of my enthusiast desire for tackle is a direct result of wanting tournament success.  Sharper hooks, better working baits, better performing reels and more sensitive rods.  Where do you reach the point of diminishing returns OR if you’re talented enough to do your own enhancements or a bottomless resource pit to draw from.

Back to the original point of old vs new, it be boiled down to one of two philosphies:

1.  How many times can you reinvent the wheel?

2.  Can you always build a better mouse trap?

 

 

 


   
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dragon1
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Posted by: @blitzdr

Part of the “problem” with improvement is defining what actual improvement is.  Is it technology?  Is it design?  Is it material?  Second point, how much is that final improvement and is it worth the cost to consumer?

A lot of my enthusiast desire for tackle is a direct result of wanting tournament success.  Sharper hooks, better working baits, better performing reels and more sensitive rods.  Where do you reach the point of diminishing returns OR if you’re talented enough to do your own enhancements or a bottomless resource pit to draw from.

Back to the original point of old vs new, it be boiled down to one of two philosphies:

1.  How many times can you reinvent the wheel?

2.  Can you always build a better mouse trap?

 

 

 

 

"Bean Counting" improvements is bottom line focused, and seldom has any influence or purpose to better the actual finished product or service.  That's pretty much in all industries.

 


   
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